Grady Financial

Investments

Investments can play a key role in your financial security plan. When exploring the world of investments, it’s important to gain a broad perspective of the various types for a clear understanding of how each of them can work towards achieving your objectives. Each has its own investment characteristics which, when applied individually, may not be appropriate for your financial profile; however, when they are strategically combined in a portfolio, they can work in concert to meet your investment objectives within your risk parameters.  It is, therefore, important to consider all investments in light of your specific objectives and risk tolerance.

  • Investments for Growth Stocks

  • Equity Mutual Funds

  • Index Funds

  • Government Securities

  • Corporate Bonds

  • Bond Mutual Funds

  • Real Estate

Employer-Sponsored Qualified Plans

Most employer-sponsored plans today are established as “defined contribution” plans whereby an employee contributes a percentage of his earnings into an account that will accumulate until retirement.  As a qualified plan, the contributions are deductible from the employee’s current income.  The amount of income received at retirement is based on the total amount of contributions, the returns earned, and the employee’s retirement time horizon.  As in all qualified plans, withdrawals made prior to age 59 ½ may be subject to a penalty of 10% on top of ordinary taxes that are due.

Depending on the size and type of the organization, they may offer a 401(k) Plan, a Simplified Employee Pension Plan or, in the case of a non-profit organization, a 403(b) plan.

In addition to helping you make sense of your employer’s retirement plan, Grady Financial also specializes in establishing retirement plans for businesses who want to offer high quality financial tools to their employees. 

Traditional and Roth IRAs

Individual Retirement Accounts (IRA) are tax-qualified retirement plans that were established as a way for individuals to save for retirement with the benefit of tax-favored treatment. The traditional IRA allows for contributions to be made on a tax-deductible basis and to accumulate without current taxation of earnings inside the account.  Distributions from a traditional IRA are taxable.  A Roth IRA is different in that the contributions are not tax deductible, however, the earnings growth is not currently taxable. To qualify for tax-free and penalty-free withdrawals of earnings, a Roth IRA must be in place for at least five tax years, and the distribution must take place after age 59 ½ or due to death, disability, or a first-time home purchase (up to a $10,000 lifetime maximum).  Depending on state law, Roth IRA distributions may be subject to state taxes.

Distributions from traditional IRAs and employer-sponsored retirement plans are taxed as ordinary income and, if taken prior to reaching 59 ½ , may be subject to an additional 10% federal tax penalty.

For more information on retirement income needs and income sources, please contact us today.

Social Security Retirement Income Estimator